Keeping Rabbits and Deer Out of Your Tulsa Landscape

We may love to watch beautiful deer and rabbits in the wild, but they’re not always so pretty when seen destroying the flowers and vegetables in our backyard. Are rabbits and deer constantly nibbling away at your garden? What can you do to keep these creatures away?

One way to ward off rabbits and deer is to plant foliage that actually repels these animals. You may try planting some aromatic perennials that rabbits and deer don’t favor. Here are few: Echinacea, chives, lavender, garlic, yarrow, peony, catnip plants, and columbine or honeysuckle. Although humans may like the smell of many of these perennials, wildlife like deer and rabbits can actually be repelled by the powerful scent of these plants. You can plant these perennials around the border of your garden or property to help repel these animals.

Along with plants that have repelling smells to certain wildlife, many fragrant soaps can act as repellents. You can hang these bars of deodorant soap, preferably wet, on trees or plants around your landscape to repel pests.

Some gardeners also make natural deer and rabbit repellents combining ingredients like red pepper, hot sauce, garlic powder, eggs, etc. and making them into a mix that these animals do not like and applying it to various plants in the garden.

Along with deer and rabbit repellent plants, many gardeners also use deer or rabbit-resistant plants. These are trees, shrubs, and plants that animals do not like to eat so they don’t bother with your garden in the first place. Deer-resistant plants, trees, and shrubs include juniper, birch, blue spruce, boxwoods, iris, daffodil, lilac, barberry, and holly. Plants that are rabbit-resistant are a little harder to tell but some include birch, hydrangea, elderberry, lilac, daffodils, sedum, and yucca. Planting shrubs that have thorns, fuzzy leaves, or thistles is also a good deterrent.

 A good fence around your garden is one of the most effective ways of keeping these animals out. To keep rabbits out, you’ll need to have a fine mesh fencing around the lower 2 feet. Fences will need to be around 8 feet high to keep out whitetail deer, or they can be slightly lower (around 6 feet) but be slanted. Solid wooden fences will of course be the best deterrent for deer so that they can’t spot what’s on the other side.

Your much-loved dog or cat may also be one of the best deterrents for deer and rabbits.  Other tactics include scaring the animals away with scarecrows, radios, loud wind chimes, and motion-sensitive floodlights.

Visit with the Tulsa landscape design specialists at Oklahoma Landscape for more tips on how to protect your garden from deer, rabbits, and insects.

 

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Tulsa Landscape Design Tips: Plants for Edging

Often in landscape design we find nature combined with artistic expression. Using a variety of plant colors and textures makes a landscape look like a living work of art and generates the peaceful ambiance where friends and family can relax and have fun. One aspect of Tulsa landscape design is creating definition to a space with edging. Many different plants and materials can be used to edge a landscape or separate one space the other. Sometimes hardscapes such as brick, stones, or pavers are used as edging around a flower bed or along a pathway. But there are a number of plants that work great for landscape edging.

Better Homes and Gardens highlighted several flowers and plants that are perfect for edging. Here are a few of their picks for best garden borders:

Alyssum, they noted, is a nice annual edging plant. With its compact design and dense spray of tiny pink, white, or lavender flowers, the alyssum makes quite a colorful bouquet of edging for your flower bed.

Japanese forestgrass is a terrific fit for the shade, it thrives in it and creates “compact mounds of gracefully arching foliage” that makes a nice accent along borders. Lady’s Mantle is great for “softening the edge of a shaded path or creating a groundcover” with its groups of chartreuse flowers and scalloped leaves.

Known as “nearly the perfect plants” by Better Homes and Gardens, sedums look great from the day they sprout with different varieties hosting red, pink, orange, and white flowers. Varieties such as Matrona, they noted, create a cool edge with taller plants behind them. These plants are also very drought-tolerant and need little care.

“Covering itself with adorable bobbing pink flowers,” the thrift plant makes a delightful edging plant or groundcover. This perennial has grassy foliage combined with little clusters of colorful flowers.

Some herbs like English lavender, sage, and thyme can also make great edging plants. Other edible plants for edges and borders include strawberries and rhubarb.

The Tulsa landscape design professionals at Oklahoma Landscape can help you design the perfect garden for your home. We can help you choose the edging plants that are right for your pathway or border to create a crisp, polished look for your Tulsa landscape.

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Tulsa Landscape Design – Delicious Edible Landscaping Ideas

We all desire a beautiful landscape to complement our home. Elegant landscape design creates a peaceful place where we can unwind on the weekends, enjoy summer evenings with family, or hospitality entertain friends. But more homeowners are opting for, not just beautiful landscapes, but delicious, edible landscapes as well.

With the trend toward organic gardening, homeowners are seeing the many benefits of Tulsa landscape design that includes blueberry bushedible plants, which are as pretty as they are scrumptious. Edible landscaping is not just about planting a garden in your backyard, but more about integrating a variety of edible trees, plants, and shrubs throughout your landscape to provide cost-effective, healthy food right at home.

In fact, Better Homes and Gardens (BHG) wrote an article online about how to include edible plants in your landscaping. Here are some of the tips they gave:

A pretty plant that fits well in the flower bed or along the border is Rhubarb, especially when paired with purple-leaved Ajuga or a similar low-growing groundcover. Strawberries are another good groundcover or edging plant for a flowerbed or even planted on a sunny slope as a groundcover.

Currant bushes and blueberry make great decorative (and delicious) shrubs. Miniature and dwarf fruit trees are available that grow about 4 or 5 feet tall and even grow well in pots. These are great for use in smaller yards. Raspberries, the article noted, do great in light to medium shade, making them easy to grow at home.

Instead of traditional vines to grow over an arbor or trellis, the article suggested grapevines or short vining-type vegetables like cucumbers, zucchini, and melons. Gorgeous grapevines will grow well over an arbor, plus you can use the leaves for decoration on platters or to top cheeses and salads, BHG said.

strawberries - edible landscapingVegetables often do well in containers, the article added. Lettuces come in a variety of colors, making them ideal for window boxes and along edges of flower beds. Hot peppers also add rich color to the landscape, especially when paired with marigolds and vinca. Swiss chard is another vegetable that comes in a “rainbow of colors” that can be paired with other vibrant flowers to create a beautiful Tulsa landscape design.

For more great edible gardening tips, check out the Edible Landscaping article on BHG. If you’d like help to incorporate more edible plants into your landscape, call the Tulsa gardening and landscape design/build experts at Oklahoma Landscape.